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Tropical Storm Alex – Update #4 – 6/5/2022

University of Florida officials are actively monitoring Tropical Storm Alex. Here’s what we know today:

The National Hurricane Center has discontinued all warnings and watches for the Florida peninsula, after the disturbance previously known as Potential Tropical Cyclone One made its way across the state on Saturday.

Though the disturbance has strengthened into Tropical Storm Alex, it no longer poses a threat to Florida.

For additional information, please visit the National Hurricane Center.

Potential Tropical Cyclone One – Update #3 – 6/4/2022

University of Florida officials are actively monitoring Potential Tropical Cyclone One. Here’s what we know today:

A tropical storm warning remains in effect for parts of Central and South Florida, as the disturbance is expected to move across the state on Saturday.

The warning area includes the west coast of Florida, from Bonita Beach to Card Sound Bridge; the east coast of Florida, south of the Volusia/Brevard County line to Card Sound Bridge; Lake Okeechobee, and the Florida Keys and Florida Bay.

Tropical storm conditions are expected in the warning area in Florida today, which include heavy rainfall throughout portions of South Florida and the Keys. Also, considerable flash and urban flooding is expected across South Florida.

As a result, UF units should continue to monitor forecasts and be prepared to follow guidance from local officials.

No tropical storm warnings or watches are in place for Alachua County, and no operational changes are anticipated for the UF campus in Gainesville. We will continue to monitor and update the UF community on expected impacts or schedule changes as information becomes available.

For additional information, please visit the National Hurricane Center.

Potential Tropical Cyclone One – Update #2 – 6/3/2022

University of Florida officials are actively monitoring Potential Tropical Cyclone One. Here’s what we know today:

The National Hurricane Center has issued a tropical storm warning for parts of Central and South Florida.

The warning extends from the west coast of Florida, south of the middle of Longboat Key to Englewood; the east coast of Florida, south of the Volusia/Brevard County line to Card Sound Bridge; and for Lake Okeechobee.

This means tropical storm conditions are expected somewhere within the warning area as early as tonight. As a result, UF units should monitor forecasts and be prepared to follow guidance from local officials.

The system is expected to bring heavy rains to portions of Central and South Florida and the Florida Keys by today and continue through Saturday. Considerable flash and urban flooding are possible across South Florida and in the Keys.

No tropical storm warnings or watches are currently in place for Alachua County and no operational changes are anticipated for the UF campus in Gainesville. We will continue to monitor and update the UF community on expected impacts or schedule changes as information becomes available.

For additional information, please visit National Hurricane Center

Potential Tropical Cyclone One – Update #1 – 6/2/2022

University of Florida officials are actively monitoring Potential Tropical Cyclone One, and much remains unknown about its path. Here’s what we know today:

Heavy rainfall is expected on Friday across portions of the Yucatan Peninsula, the Cayman Islands and western Cuba.

These heavy rains are likely to affect South Florida and the Florida Keys by Friday. Considerable flash and urban flooding are possible across the urban corridors in South Florida and in the Keys. A tropical storm watch area is currently in place for the Florida peninsula and the Florida Keys. UF units should monitor forecasts and be prepared to follow guidance from local officials.

Additionally, no tropical storm warnings or watches are currently in place for Alachua County, and no operational changes are anticipated for the UF campus in Gainesville. We will continue to monitor and update the UF community on expected impacts as information becomes available.

For additional information, please visit National Hurricane Center